Reviews (2,560)

  • In Hong Kong in 1988 it was decided that they would have to have the Cat III category where the films were just too much with sex, horror or gore and had to stop children going in. The film began with Men Behind the Sun (1988) which is truly appalling and it might have been that the government must have not banned the film but maybe because the atrocities were committed by the Japanese they were happy to show it. Because there was a large audience and so came more films and the first big one was The Eight Immortals Restaurant: The Untold Story (1993) starring Anthony Chau-Sang Wong and directed by Tun-Fei Mou and which was a sensation. Later came Ebola Syndrome (1996) which also has much sex, horror and gore and also with humour. I find this rather difficult when the awful scenes are so terrible that we are supposed to laugh at rape and the mention of young children as well although we have to say that it is rather well made. I think that if we look at this as just a joke okay but unfortunately the amusement fades away and the terrible nasty scenes are still there.
  • It's not wonderful but it is fairly good especially of course that Marlene Dietrich is more than okay with the wonderful costumes, even if she is best as a sailor, and the songs are fine. John Wayne had dozens of small parts through the 20s and many westerns during the 30s and in this one he is really good and is so fresh you might have thought he hadn't already made almost a hundred films before this. I really like Broderick Crawford and he is splendid in this funny and chasing around and brawling all the time with looking after Dietrich. There is enough going on without noticing that there isn't really any story.
  • This is partly a difficult film and starts with too much and horrible brawling fights and also so much drinking all the time. But the good director Barbet Schroeder has great control and for both Faye Dunaway and Mickey Rourke may be their best performances. We know that we are interested in the splendid writing of Charles Bukowski and gradually we are won over and able to very much enjoy the film. There is some humour and in the end we even smile as it is obvious that another fight comes along as the drinking will have to be suspended. A very brave and impressive picture showing the seedy side of Hollywood.
  • It is not fantastic but amazingly wonderful of some of the great stars of the 30s I hardly know. But it is an early part for George Raft in his first big film, he seems a bit strange but I suppose it was the time but he made 8 films that year including Scarface. Constance Cummings only 22 at the time and also made 8 films that year this one of her first films and she is lovely. We have to wait for about half an hour before Mae West arrives, her very first film and every thing gets going when she is there. It was clear that she was going places as she sparkled so much more even though there are so many others running around. Amusing and fun to see all the others but really it is Mae West.
  • What a splendid little film although I had read the Georges Simenon book but not having watched this it seems was never seen in UK. It is a rather lovely little story with lots of going on underneath not to mention the strangling of a rather lot of women we do not see and about a 'ghost' that is rather strange and never mind that the hatter is followed by the tailor and he seems to have fun until one day he can't. Michel Serrault the great actor and has so many different films like with The Inquisitor (1981) with Lino Ventura, La Cage Aux Folles (1978) and even Les Diaboliques (1955). The very good Charles Aznavour is under played as the Armenian tailor with little money but looks as if he knows what is going on as we are also eventually. It is such a lovely and amusing although nasty but similarly and clever Chabrol film.
  • It is not that good but in the Arrow, Gothic Fantastico box but just a little better than the Lady Morgan's Vengeance. There are some moments but really nothing too wonderful and the sets or painting a bit poor but some good bits in the castle and tower. Directed by Alberto De Martino and I really loved his The Antichrist (1974) although many don't, and that The Man With Icy Eyes (1971) which is okay. I thought Helga Line was the scary housekeeper and just about the best thing in the film but although she made about a hundred films for some reason never really reached the top. In The Faceless Monster (1965) she had to be also with Barbara Steele and with So Sweet...So Perverse (1969) against Carroll Baker and Erika Blanc and also with Horror Express (1972) and she has so much competition. If the story and writing had been a bit better maybe poor Helga Line could have had a few more lines and helped the film.
  • Although I rather enjoy some of Yasuhru Ozu I find that they are always rather theatrical and usually about women who want their girls to get married. I have loved hundreds of Japanese films but not really all these ones although many people do love them maybe because they really seem to be very 'Japanese'. Anyway this one has all the women concerned with the local club dues that must have gone missing and the boys who spend most of the time trying to get a TV or playing a game, with their friends, of punching their foreheads and also farting. One always pushes too much and has to go home to change his pants. The technicolor is wonderful and there are some moments of charm and humour especially with the boys and their vow of silence. Fortunately not too long.
  • It is wonderful I used to watch old silent films and rather sad not surprising as being almost 100 years ago and now we have a Blu-ray for the first time as pristine as possible. The music is also fantastic presented in the Eureka print by Nora Kroll-Rosenbaum & Laura Karpman. From the very beginning there is for us an amazing massive set of Notre Dame (just the front) and hundreds of extras running around having fun even before the action starts and never ends. Lon Chaney as the hunchback is splendid as Quasimodo this great part makes him an even bigger star and continues on to The Phantom of the Opera (1925). The pretty gypsy dancer has an innocence in Patsy Ruth Miller almost as good as Chaney.
  • For some reason I have never seen this before and even though my father had written the first book of Boris Karloff, I really should have watched this as it is pretty good. Another reason is that this also has Bela Lugosi and it is one of his better ones. He is good but Karloff is such a superlative actor and even if the film is not too sophisticated it is a good story and he is really effective in the first part when he demonstrates his ray. Later in the jungle it becomes less interesting but he really gets into it and finds his 'Radium X' which becomes contaminated by radioactive meteorite. In the third part Karloff becomes annoyed that his 'invisible ray' is taken from him and he gets a bit crazy and thinks that he should kill them all even his wife. Karloff always said that he should not have been known as 'horror' but the publisher insisted known as 'The Horror Man' but then in the States it was changed to just 'Karloff' with this film credits just the same.
  • Really not very good at all. It is obvious that as there were so many slashers in the 80s and me watching too many of them and this becomes to get boring so I maybe being unfair. It is unusual to see the killer at the start but we don't know who he is. Roz Kelly had clearly been a fun girl but that was a few years ago. The 70s bands, Shadow and Made in Japan were okay but there was rather a lot of the music and too much of the New Year's Eve party. There is not much blood or even that many thrills and sadly that the very end was a bit of an anti-climax and the non event and not like a surprise.
  • Not quite the most obvious idea of a film from Peckinpah although he really doesn't make any of the obvious ones. It is because his amazing and stunning, The Wild Bunch (1969) the constant and bloody action is so odd that his next film would seem very quiet. In fact this is almost without action but is eccentric with a really lovely and crazy part for Jason Robards and a wonderful part with Stella Stevens as a sexy partner. David Warner was rather offbeat in this unusual part and as good as he always is. The next one was Straw Dogs (1971) and its back to the action again although the next one was the rather sweet Junior Bonner (1972) by Steve McQueen as the appealing rodeo action which is another slice of life as a small movie like Cable Hogue although this one is a bit longer than it really should have been.
  • It is pretty terrible and rather a shame. Paganini was born in 1782 and he became such a great player that he was known as 'The Devil's Violinist' which it seems it was believed to be a gift from the devil. It was a great idea that Luigi Cozzi supposedly discovers some lost music and turns it into an 80s girl band so they can have a hit song. They rather make a sad noise with big hair and then run around and screaming because one after the other is lost. And that is about it with some blood but not much and then some small scenes with Donald Pleasence and the splendid Daria Nicolodi is sadly rather running around with the others and holding hands, and screaming.
  • Its probably some 35 years since I watched this and yet the problem is that of course that we will always remember that things are going to be good but then go wrong. I also seemed to know that the rabbit was going to be sad and that everything gets worse all the time. I find that during the film I think that surely that Michael Douglas will not fall for the reasons that Glenn Close falls for him every time. Surely I will imagine she will make up that she is pregnant and she tells him and even a tape she gives him and he plays it in the car and at home. Although the last half hour is really good and it is almost makes the whole film as good but I'm not sure I will watch this again too soon.
  • I always love this and now with an amazing Blu-ray and wonderful print it is even better. The big game hunter is Joel McCrea who made more that 90 films and was mostly later in westerns but has time in this one to put on his tie before going off to try and save the drunk Robert Armstrong, the amusing and fast talking character. The splendid Leslie Banks, the Englishman in his first film and has to stroke his nasty scar with the great name of Zaroff. The beautiful Fay Wray made some 100 films and in the next film 1933, she made eleven more films as well as The Vampire Bat, The Mystery of the Museum and of course King Kong and used some of the same sets. It is only just over an hour but it doesn't waste any time at all. Great.
  • I watched The Pemini Organisation short film which is only 42 minutes but very good of Edward Woodward and also June Ritchie. It is rather splendid but far too wordy for such a short movie and there is not really any real action. Woodward made 100 films and TV although a lot of it was TV he did manage to make The Wicker Man (1973) and more recently Hot Fuzz (2007). Peter Crane directed and I wonder if this performance led to his casting in Wicker Man. June Ritchie made a few films was mainly on TV but she did make the rather splendid, A Kind of Loving (1962). I can't say that this is fantastic but is rather well done but maybe it would have been better as a play.
  • Really a fun slasher and I especially loved the train location shots rushing through the snow in Canada. I also liked the interiors as well as the costumes and David Copperfield, the magician. For Roger Spottiswoode it was his first film as director and a good start although we have to mention Jamie Lee Curtis who had only just started with Halloween three years before. With the goings on of the party celebrations as the train thunders along there is something always going on and Jamie Lee is really good. There was also the splendid Ben Johnson as the guard, driver and trying to look after the students. We do not really get to see the slashing but the afterwards are good enough.
  • In this Hitchcock film I wanted suspense and maybe some murder. There is some suspense with fast cars on the small roads, the cliff edges maybe being pushed and glass of milk carried up the stairs. Of course it all happens, and the iridescent milk is fantastic but rather than suspense there is more romance and comedy. Cary Grant is great and amusing, the lovely Joan Fontaine is okay although she really needed to be someone rather plain for this part. She just acted as if she was a bit dim because it is just so easy for Grant although we get to think it is a bit silly. Nigel Bruce just makes it even more funny but that is what we don't need. So its all okay and you know that Hitch is smiling up his sleeve as we think that it is all so clever as it is or not if we are still with the story.
  • I know that many people like this and I like the writer, David McGillivray who wrote the films of Peter Walker, but this didn't seemed too much sex and funny in the Norman J Warren who I assume wanted horror. The action was pretty good but the script is so poor that the actors look like they have no idea and it might seem as if they didn't have any acting experience. Carolyn Courage is fine and if it was only like the others and the horror action just might have been okay. Because the good bits bring down the poor stuff and only as the film is short we can just about hang on for the story as a decent end.
  • The third known as the Faith Trilogy after Through a Glass Darkly (1961) and Winter Light (1963) but this one is rather different. There is even only one mention of God and Bergman found the film very different and said, 'the problem doesn't exist anymore. Nothing, absolutely nothing at all as emerged out of all these ideas of faith and scepticism.' Gunnel Lindblom both with Bergman's films is particularly great in this one as well, of course, the splendid Ingrid Thulin. Jorgen Lindstrom was the 12 year old boy is really good and all through the two women. He was also in Night Games (1966) but never did much more as he was older. The fantastic and different like film, did have a problem at the time because of the sensation and scandal of the sexual content. The masturbation and the other scenes including two others of the couple having sex and an anonymous couple in the audience of the music-hall, not even mentioned are the dwarfs performing and back at the hotel. It is all so amazing and such a change in just a couple of years.
  • I have received a lovely Blu-ray, sleeve and booklet with good artwork. Even as the film starts, it seems a bit too arty but it is nice to see Ricki Lake and Ted Raimi, at first. The short but rather splendid first slashing scene but unfortunately it is repeated all the time. It is really nice to see Traci Lords and really as the Raimi scenes go on and on we might have rather watched Lords. Although we finally get to watch a skinner scene but it is rather poor and we probably realise why we haven't seen so many. There are still some arty bits and some nasty bits but it is really so silly that this sadly just gets too unbelievable. It is a shame because they clearly had a good idea but not enough money for his vision.
  • There is nothing really wonderful about this little film but, as it often happens, it is something unusual. Sometimes there are odd things that make us sit up like this one. It is very strange that the two girls have sex and yet they have brought the odd guy into the lovely big house and think that having a game of hide and seek would be fun. Also probably the most horrific moment was the slow-motion scenes in muddy water. Barry Stokes was great and although he had some TV, but did not make many films and then the really good one, The Corruption of Chris Miller (1973). Sally Faulkner is a bit poor but has made several films some as a lesbian but her best one was the fantastic, Daughters of Darkness (1974). Glory Annan was rather splendid but never really did much although starred in Felicity (1978). This very strange film is well worth checking out.
  • This is a rather sad film to watch and I have to imagine that Bergman himself had to struggle like this pastor struggling with his belief in God. This is very good and we believe that the congregation is having difficulties themselves but the dialogue is realistic but it is a little sad that the people could be so lost. The Sven Nykist photography is splendid but it is so difficult that we have to watch about half an hour of the service and afterwards the churchgoers present him with their problems because they were lost or disturbed. Bergman wondered if we are better off not believing it makes more sense of the world.
  • This is very strange and for at least the first half hour I couldn't work out what was going on. And then later I found that I was still trying to understand what was happening and then I stopped worrying about what was going on and just enjoyed what ever it was. It was because right at the beginning it was nice watching the surreal landscape with the odd palm trees in their long lines and a women who appears now and again. The grandmother's house is strange, the two youngsters who are living there as their father has died and their mother apparently a long time ago and everything is odd especially the grandfather. But things are not as they seem and this is not the most obvious horror film that I have seen for a long time.
  • A rather complicated story but always interesting and thrilling although not exactly rip-roaring. Raymond Massey really good and nice to see him having a better part than he often has. He made 80 or more films and TV. The Woman in the Window (1944) another noir like this one and Arsenic and Old Lace (1944). Van Heflin another character actor and also had further roles like this one, Shane (1953) and the splendid 3:10 to Yuma (1957). Joan Crawford is of course wonderful and in this one she really has a number of parts within the same film as she looks lovely or terrible, loving or killing but always great. It was not quite as fantastic as the earlier year Mildred Pierce but keeps you involved to the very end.
  • It is really not wonderful but it is considered the first gangster film and has all the hallmarks. A lot of many seemingly old men all looking around on the stage waiting to say their lines. I have to say that Edward G. Robinson has a certain something, a rather pretentious guy who acts as if will be a big man. And he also will be become more successful in noir but at least this is a start even if he is still overacting but he will get better. I have to say that he looks good with a gun and especially from a moving car and the one from the church steps is amazing and those little old cars look great.
An error has occured. Please try again.