Reviews (5,914)

  • Warning: Spoilers
    Janitor W.C. (a solid and likeable performance by Dan Palmer, who also wrote the tight and witty script) finds himself stuck in the women's bathroom in the office building he works at after a zombie outbreak occurs on Christmas Eve.

    Director Christian James keeps the enjoyable story moving along at a zippy pace, makes the most out of the cramped and confined restroom setting, maintains a pleasing tongue-in-cheek tone throughout, gets a good deal of laughs from the cheerfully dark sense of humor, and even delivers a generous serving of bloody gore. Moreover, Palmer as the hapless W.C. makes for a sympathetic hard-luck protagonist; he receives spirited support from Antonia Bernath as the feisty Heather, Tamaryn Payne as snippy office hottie Evie, and Mark Holden as the would-be heroic Jeff from I.T. A total hoot.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    Spunky college student Sawyer (an excellent and appealing portrayal by Hermoine Corlfield) runs afoul of pernicious drug dealers after she gets lost in the deep Kentucky woods. Sawyer forms an uneasy alliance with mysterious loner and meth cooker Lowell (a fine and credible performance by Jay Paulson) in order to improve her chances of getting out of the wilderness alive.

    Director Jen McGowan relates the absorbing story at a measured, yet steady pace, offers a vivid evocation of the downhome country setting, builds a good deal of tension, takes time to develop the characters, and makes excellent use of the gorgeous forest setting. The sound acting by the capable cast helps a lot: Sean O'Bryan as brutal corrupt sheriff O'Doyle, Mieah Hauptman as the sinister Hollister, Daniel R. Hill as hairy behemoth Buck, Jeremy Glazer as eager deputy Nick Katz, and John Marshall Jones as ramrod state trooper Slattery. The strained, but sincere relationship between Sawyer and Lowell gives this picture a surprising amount of heart. Michelle Lawler's striking widescreen cinematography provides some breathtaking shots of the beautiful sylvan scenery. Well worth a watch.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    An expedition group led by conservationist Larry Black (a fine and likeable performance by Rupert Reid) find themselves being stalked by a lethal legendary beast deep in the Indonesian jungle.

    Writer/director Andrew Traucki keeps the absorbing story moving along at a steady pace, takes time to develop the characters, makes nice use of the exotic bright green jungle locations, and generates a good deal of tension, with an especially harrowing last fifteen minutes with our desperate protagonists realizing with grim certainty that this particular expedition may very well be their last one. Moreover, there are sturdy supporting contributions from Agoes Widjaya Soedjarwo as the helpful Budi and Igusti Budianthika as expert tracker Adi. In addition, the spare stripped-down simple documentary style gives this film a joltingly effective you-are-there immediacy. The briefly seen monster looks pretty gnarly, too. A nice little nail-biter.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    Prim'n'proper school teacher Miss Meadows (a delightful portrayal by the adorable Katie Holmes) also just happens to be a vigilante who's dedicated to ridding the world of evildoers. Complications ensue after Miss Meadows falls in love with the sheriff (likeable James Badge Dale) of the small town that she's recently moved into.

    Writer/director Karen Leigh Hopkins relates the enjoyably offbeat story at a constant pace, maintains an utterly beguiling quirky tone, nicely evokes a pleasant small town atmosphere, presents a neat array of colorful characters, and spices things up with amusing touches of wickedly funny dark humor along with a few surprisingly poignant moments. With her white gloves and socks, pretty dresses, black tap shoes, impeccable sense of grace and decorum, and persistently perky demeanor, Holmes as Miss Meadows makes for a charmingly kooky anti-heroine. Moreover, there are sturdy supporting contributions from Jean Smart as Miss Meadws' equally well-mannered mother, Mary Kay Place as cheery neighbor Mrs. Davenport, Ava Kolker as sweet little girl Heather, Callan Mulvey as skeezy ex-con Skylar, and Graham Beckel as creepy sexual predator Tony Weaver. Further enhanced by Jeff Cardoni's bouncy score and Barry Markowitz's bright cinematography, this film overall rates as a total idiosyncratic treat.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    A horror film about the evil demonic yuletide beast Krampus terrorizing a small town around Christmastime sounds like a super cool idea on paper, but alas writer/director Jason Hull totally fumbles the ball. For starters, the blah and uninvolving story unfolds at a painfully sluggish pace. Nest up, there's precious little in the way of any essential tension or spooky atmosphere, plus no kind of sense of the noel season as well. Krampus looks like something that was made for a kindergarten school play. The gore is likewise seriously cruddy. The acting by the lame no-name cast for the most part is simply terrible, with only ever-reliable indie horror regular Bill Oberst Jr. managing to rise well above the muck with a stand-out turn as an angry and vengeful criminal. This movie gets one star from me because of Oberst Jr.; the other two stars are because of Angelina Leigh's beautifully bountiful bare breasts. A real clunker.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    Hill (an excellent Michael Warren) and Renko (a fine Charles Haid) are unable to keep their partnership workable after Renko leaves Hill hanging. Coffey (likeable Ed Marinato) and Bates (a solid Betty Thomas) have to clean up grubby homeless guy Jerry Goth (an outstanding portrayal by Jeffrey DeMunn) so Davenport (a terrific Veronica Hamel) can use him as a witness. Jablonski (sturdy Robert Prosky) gets accused of setting fire to the Bowl Mor Lanes Bowling Alley.

    Hill and Renko have a couple of strong and emotional confrontation scenes, with Renko in particular showing signs that the inherent pressure of being a police officer is really starting to wear him down. Goth's surprisingly articulate testimony in court is truly something to behold while his ultimate tragic fate proves to be absolutely heartbreaking. Connie (an exquisitely annoying Frances McDormand) once again reveals herself to be a very cold and opportunistic lawyer who's always looking for loopholes to use to her advantage. Moreover, it's nice to see Belker (well played by Bruce Weitz) help Jablonski out of a jam. Garibaldi (charming Ken Olin) and Fay (sweet Barbara Bosson) hitting it off on a second date caps this episode off on a pleasing upbeat note.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    Gruff army captain Jason Briggs (Ross Hagen in top growly form) and his squad of misfit soldiers find themselves stranded on a remote island that's populated by foxy cave women and terrorized by a huge man-eating Tyrannosaurus rex.

    Directors Jim Wynorski and Fred Olen Ray keep the enjoyably inane story zipping along at a brisk pace, maintain a likeable lighthearted tone throughout, get loads of laughs from the amusing sense of blithely campy humor, and deliver a pleasing plenitude of tasty bare female flesh. This film further benefits from a bevy of beautiful babes: Toni Naples as the formidable Queen Morganna, Antonia Dorian as the feisty April, Griffin Drew as the perky April, Michelle Bauer as the sweet June, Nikki Fritz as a blue-painted high priestess, Becky LaBeau as an ill-fated virgin sacrifice, and Deborah Dutch as a background cave girl.

    The rest of the enthusiastic cast have a ball with the goofy material: Richard Gabai as smartaleck John Skeemer, Peter Spellos as bumbling butterball Turbo, Tom Shell as the nerdy Wayne, and Steve Barkett as the uptight Sergeant Healey. The cheesy puppet dinosaurs possess a certain loveably rinky-dink charm. Chuck Cirino's spirited score hits the stirring spot. Competent cinematography by the furiously prolific Gary Graver, too. A total kitschy blast.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    Pro-life activist Mr. Ardrey (an excellent portrayal by Nicholas Pryor) accidentally causes the pregnant Mrs. Florio (a touching turn by Patricia Wettig) to go into labor after hitting her with his picket sign at a protest. LaRue (a nicely sleazy Kiel Martin) and Washington (the ever-smooth Taurean Blacque) film a home security video for shady producer Larry (a deliciously smarmy performance by Brent Spiner). Jablonski (a fine Robert Prosky) has a disagreement with the Bowling Federation.

    The touchy issue of abortion is well handled with admirable taste and intelligence, with Davenport (a terrific Veronica Hamel) clashing with rival lawyer Connie (a spot-on obnoxious Frances McDormand) over Connie's callous and opportunistic approach to the Mr. Ardrey situation. Jablonski's bowling problem provides some nice insight into his gruff no-nonsense personality. LaRue's hopeless woodenness as he stiffly attempts to host the home security video provides a few good laughs, plus it's a hoot to see LaRue stumbling his way into an eventual hardcore shoot with himself as a not so reluctant participant. Moreover, this episode gets substantial powerful dramatic mileage from Renko (solid Charles Haid) and Hill (an equally sound Michael Warren) having a falling out after Renko fails to have Hill's back.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    Random sudden sinkholes threaten to spoil everyone's Mardi Gras fun in New Orleans. It's up to rogue geologist Matt Andrews (a solid and likeable performance by John Corbett) to save the day.

    While director Mario Azzopardi keeps the enjoyably asinine story moving along at a brisk pace, maintains a serious tone throughout, and offers a flavorsome Big Easy atmosphere, he crucially fails to provide much in the way of any essential tension. The dodgy CGI effects and the inevitable cornball subplot about greedy jerks refusing to evacuate the city because they place more value on money over human life don't help matters any. Fortunately, the game cast do their best with the silly formulaic material: Jessica Steen as the sweet, but fed-up Allison Beauchamp, Brittany Daniel as the spunky Cinder Evers, Andrew Kraulis as the dashing Dalton, Peter Stebbings as wormy and conniving city official George Regan, Derwin Jordan as the valiant Remy, and Eugene Clark as concerned Mayor John Lafitte. Moreover, this teleflick deserves some praise for not punking out on its premise: A bunch of Mardi Gras celebrants are killed and others severely banged up after a sinkhole opens up in the middle of a street. A passable time-killer.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    Down on his luck private detective P.J. Detweiler (well played with rumpled grace and conviction by George Peppard) finds himself embroiled in murder and conspiracy after he takes a job as bodyguard to Maureen Preble (a sturdy and enticing portrayal by the lovely and classy Gayle Hunnicutt), who's the mistress of fastidious and overbearing millionaire William Orbison (Raymond Burr in peak deliciously despicable form).

    Director John Guillerman relates the enjoyable and engrossing story at a snappy pace, makes nice use of New York City locations, stages several thrilling action set pieces with skill and flair (a fight sequence set in a gay bar in particular rates as a definite hysterical highlight), and expertly crafts an engaging breezy'n'easy tone with a strong underlying feeling of moral decay and cynicism. Philip H. Reisman's smart script boasts plenty of sharp dialogue as well as offers a colorful array of seedy and/or desperate characters.

    The fine acting by the tip-top cast rates as another significant asset: Brock Peters as amiable chief inspector Waterpark, Wilfrid Hyde-White as the jolly and debonair Billings-Browne, Jason Evers as smooth flunky Jason Greenoble, Coleen Gray as Orbison's browbeaten wife Betty, Susan Saint James as brash tart Linette, Severn Darden as mincing butler Shelton Quell, George Furth as the persnickety Sonny Silene, and Herb Edelman as friendly bartender Charlie. The slick cinematography by Loyal Griggs provides a pleasing polished look. Neal Hefti's smooth and jaunty jazzy score hits the swinging spot. A very worthwhile and satisfying mystery thriller.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    Vampire gunslinger Drake Robey (a splendidly sinister performance by Michael Pate) terrorizes a small frontier town. It's up to Preacher Dan (nicely played by Eric Fleming) to stand up to Robey and figure out a way to destroy him after Robey takes a fancy to beautiful rancher Dolores Carter (an appealing portrayal by the very fetching Kathleen Crowley).

    Director/co-writer Edward Dein relates the enjoyably offbeat story at a steady pace, ably crafts a pleasing spooky atmosphere, treats the inspired oddball premise with admirable seriousness, and offers a flavorsome evocation of the 19th century period setting. The solid acting by the capable cast helps a lot: John Hoyt as the puzzled Dr. Carter, Bruce Gordon as greedy rival rancher Buffer, Edward Binns as the tough, but sensible sheriff, Jay Adler as a harried bartender, and Jimmy Murphy as the excitable Tim. The black-clad Robey makes for an effective, interesting, and even fairly sympathetic villain. Kudos are also in order for Irving Getz's sharp black and white cinematography and Ellis W. Carter's spirited shivery score. A cool little handy dandy genre combo flick.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    Honest straight-arrow cop Vince Newman (adroitly played with right-on world-weary conviction by George Peppard) has both his job and integrity threatened after he uncovers an international drug ring that several high-ranking police officers are involved with.

    Directed with utmost taut efficiency by Richard T. Heffron, with a compact script by Anthony Wilson, an absorbing story that unfolds at a constant pace, nice use of various seedy locations, crisp cinematography by Vilis Lapenieks, a gritty downbeat tone complete with an uncompromisingly grim ending, a groovy dissonant bluesy'n'jazzy score by Robert Prince, a vivid evocation of a certain plausibly drab'n'seamy workaday reality, and a few exciting and expertly staged action set pieces (a shootout in a sprawling department store in particular seriously smokes in no uncertain terms), this shamefully neglected little pip totally hits the supremely funky'n'cynical 70's cop movie spot.

    The sound acting by the capable cast further keeps this picture humming: Roger Robinson as Newman's loyal partner Garry, Eugene Roche as shifty superior Reardon, Gordon Pinsent as eager D.A. Jack Eastman, Abe Vigoda as fearsome mobster John Dellanzia, Michael Lerner as wormy lawyer Frank Acker, Louis Zorich as slippery Mafia capo Frank Lo Falcone, Victor Campos as decent flatfoot Peter Jimenez, Mel Stewart as tough drug kingpin Quist, Teddy Wilson as sniveling pusher Jaycee, Marlene Clark as Garry's sweet wife Edie, and Pat Anderson as foxy model informant Sharon. Well worth a watch.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    The randy daughters of an equally lascivious old coot farmer gleefully tag team and humiliate geeky farmhand Fred. The tables are turned on the gals when a trio of degenerate escaped convicts show up. Even Fred decides to join in on the depraved fun.

    Writer/director Zebedy Colt pulls no punches in this extremely sick and twisted hardcore roughie: We've got rape, murder, incest, splashy water sports (gross!), even forced sodomy, fellatio, and a lesbian three way between the daughters and their MILFy mom (70's porno goddess Gloria Leonard). Susan McBain, Nancy Dare, and Marlene Willoughby are all blazing hot as the titular libidinous ladies. Moreover, it's a total hoot to see famous monologist Spalding Gray play the cheerfully evil ringleader of the escaped convicts. Super mean and perverse even by decadent 70's adult cinema standards, this wickedly enjoyable jaw-dropper overall rates as a really rough ride.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    Calletano (a fine Rene Enriquez) fills in for Furillo (a typically outstanding Daniel J. Travanti) when Furillo attends a therapy session. Hunter's (a spot on James Sikking) stolen RV turns into a hostage situation. Garilbaldi (a nicely smarmy Ken Olin) takes issue with Goldblume (sturdy Joe Spano) seeing Gina (Jennifer Tilly in stupendously sexy form). Hill (likeable Michael Warren) and Renko (solid Charles Haid) go out on patrol while high on pot.

    The therapy session between various stressed-out police captains not surprisingly gets really volatile at times; the way these guys bare their souls and admit that the pressure of their tough job wares them down makes for very poignant and powerful viewing, with Furillo doing his best to keep his cool until one particular captain goes to town on him. Moreover, Lane Smith contributes a top-notch turn as Mike, who's the man running the therapy session. The hostage situation likewise gets pretty tense, but at least is resolved in a peaceful manner. Belker (sterling work by Bruce Weitz) has a strong bathroom confrontation with Jablonski (equally sound work by Robert Prosky). In addition, it's nice to see Calletano handle his captain duties well and get praised by Furillo for a job well done at the end.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    Goldblume (sturdy Joe Spano) and Coffey (solid Ed Marinaro) work undercover as waiters to catch mobster Al Di Piano (veteran character actor Charles Tyner in peak nasty form); Gina (an endearingly ditsy Jennifer Tilly) helps them out by wearing a wire. Belker (a fine Bruce Weitz) and Robin (sweet Lisa Sutton) get back together. Fay (outstanding work by Barbara Bosson) makes several abortive attempts to help out browbeaten welfare mother Ruby Brown (a touching portrayal by Vernee Watson). Hunter (the always amusing James Sikking) has his RV stolen.

    The storyline about Brown proves to be extremely poignant; it ultimately culminates in Brown killing her abusive husband and teaches Fay a hard lesson on the often thankless nature of policework. Moreover, it's a hoot to watch Goldblume steal Gina from right under Garibaldi's (a nicely smarmy Ken Olin) nose. The subplot with Belker busting street musician Muzel (a lively performance by Hamilton Camp) provides some good laughs and concludes on a sweet note with Muzel serenading Belker and Robin. Harry Frazier makes a hilarious appearance as a crazy hell and brimstone prophet while Frances McDormand as lawyer Connie winds up making a bad call concerning Ruby Brown.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    Scientists find out that a group of meteorites are hurtling towards Earth. They must figure out a way to stop them before it's too late.

    Director Paola Heusch nicely captures a sense of mounting dread and panic: Animals freak out, huge glowing lights are seen in the sky, fires break out everywhere, and folks have to be evacuated from towns and cities into emergency shelters. Moreover, the climax with the launching of numerous missiles all over the world is quite exciting. The Russian guy who totally loses his stuff is an absolute hoot and a half. The special effects are kind of hokey, but still possess a certain snazzy charm. However, this film nonetheless still suffers from often slack pacing, an overly talky script, and some comically terrible dubbing, with an obnoxiously hearty reporter and the astronaut hero's annoying brat son standing out as the worst offenders in this particular regard. An acceptable diversion.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    The feisty and determined Lena (a sturdy and appealing portrayal by Catherine Steadman) has dedicated her life to hunting down Nazi war criminals. While tracking down the elusive Klausener in Eastern Europe Lena encounters a NATO task force that in turn winds up confronting a lethal battalion of seemingly unstoppable Nazi zombie soldiers.

    Director/co-writer Steve Barker relates the enjoyable and engrossing story at a constant pace, ably crafts a grim gloom-doom atmosphere, stages the brutal and intense attack and combat set pieces with rip-roaring go-for-the-throat gusto, maintains a dark serious tone throughout, and delivers a satisfying serving of splatter. The solid acting by the capable cast keeps this movie humming: Richard Coyle as crafty engineer Wallace, Nick Nevern as the sarcastic Carlisle, Daniel Caltagirone as no-nonsense squad leader Macavoy, Gary McDonald as gutsy soldier Abbot, and Julian Wadham as reluctant evil scientist Francis Hunt. The Nazi zombies are quite creepy and ferocious, with the cackling hag lady zombie in particular rating as a deliciously grotesque marvel to behold A super cool flick.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    Man, this indie horror flick was simply amazing! For starters, the story was so original and inspired: It's about this lady who inherits a creepy old farmhouse with a dark history and grim curse attached to it. I've never seen a horror film before with that particular premise. The scarecrow was really scary, too. Okay, so he's just some guy wearing gloves and overalls with a burlap sack over his head, but he still scared the living poop out of me just the same. I also loved how the story just dragged along at a super slow pace. All those scenes with people just standing around talking were so lively and exciting! Beautifully nuanced acting, sharp writing, and masterful direction, too! This film is just loaded with tension and spooky atmosphere! It's sure to be considered a true classic of the horror genre by countless generations of future horror fans. And any rumors that the filmmakers paid me twenty bucks cash to write this rave review on the IMDb are patently untrue.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    The opulent ocean liner Titanic hits an iceberg in the freezing cold ocean and slowly sinks into the sea taking more than half the crew and passengers with her.

    Director Billy Hale provides a flavorsome period atmosphere, keeps excess goopy sentiment in check, and maintains a steady pace throughout. James Costigan's smart script gives nice insights into the strictly delineated caste system on the ship as well as presents a vivid cross section of folks running the gamut from steerage passengers to wealthy individuals in first class. The ace acting by the tip-top cast rates as another substantial asset, with especially stand-out contributions from David Warner as amiable teacher Laurence Beesley, Cloris Leachman as an extremely boisterous Molly Brown, Harry Andrews as the hearty Captain Edward J. Smith, Ian Holm as a surprisingly sympathetic and tormented J. Bruce Ismay, David Janssen as the distinguished John Jacob Astor, Beverly Ross as Astor's young bride Madeline, Helen Mirren as sweet stewardess May Sloan, Aubrey Morris as jolly steward John Hart, and Geoffrey Whitehead as resigned ship designer Thomas Andrews. Antoinette O'Reilly makes a striking impression as a raving Irish beauty. Kudos are also in order for Howard Blake's rousing score. Best of all, this made-for-TV production really succeeds in creating a handful of characters that the viewer truly cares about, which in turn brings a strong and heart-wrenching sense of the considerable and horrible human loss inherent in this tragic event.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    This 27-minute documentary offers a really loving and enjoyable portrait of legendary bluesman B.B. King. King talks about how he got started, points out that he plays the blues with feeling from the heart, describes the blues as life lived in the past, present, and future, notes that he usually writes the lyrics first when he comes up with a song, and discusses how the music he was doing was quite new when he first hit the scene. Composer Ira Newborn talks about how he wrote the score for the film Into the Night for King while director John Landis treats King with utmost respect and reverence. Moreover, King not only performs scorching hot live versions of "Into the Night," "In the Midnight Hour," and "The Thrill is Gone," but also lays down some blistering guitar licks. Keep 'em peeled for Eddie Murphy, Jeff Goldlum, Michelle Pfeiffer, Dan Aykroyd, and Steve Martin as members of King's band, plus Forrest J. Ackerman can be glimpsed in the audience. Essential viewing for B.B. King fans.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    A hunt for a killer known as the Melon Felon -- he decapitates his victims -- kicks into high gear. Daniels (Jon Cypher in sublimely slimy form) criticizes Mayo (an appealing portrayal by Mimi Kuzyk) on her police work in the wake of their disastrous dinner date. LaRue (a fine Kiel Martin) plays a joke on the cantankerous Lt. Tabor (robustly played to the huffy hilt by Dana Elcar) that backfires. Belker (an excellent Bruce Weitz) celebrates his 37th birthday.

    Daniels comes across as more of a scumbag as usual -- and even gets to show a more humane and vulnerable side as well, plus does eventually apologize to Mayo for being nasty to her. Moreover, it's great to see Furillo (the always terrific Daniel J. Travanti) stand up to Daniels and go to bat for Mayo. In addition, Tabor is a seriously hateful and obnoxious racist jerk who deserves to be taken down a few pegs, although the prank LaRue plays on him is pretty cruel. Best of all, this episode offers some strong insights into the difficulty inherent in mixing one's personal and professional lives together. Taylor Negron contributes a memorably slimy turn as low-rent pimp Tommy.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    On her first day as Assistant DA Davenport (a terrific Veronica Hamel) seeks the truth on the assault of black athlete Lester Eagleton (a stand-out turn by Derrick Price) by white teens. Hunter (sturdy James Sikking) lets Belker (a fine Bruce Weitz) stay in his RV. Mayo (sweet Mimi Kuzyk) has a date with Chief Daniels (Jon Cypher in peak smarmy form). Furillo (the always excellent Daniel J. Travanti) busts a gun dealer who gets off on a technicality.

    The central story about the assault on Lester proves to be quite powerful because it not only centers on the always relevant (and upsetting) issue of racism, but also astutely pegs the tricky nature of the legal system in which getting a sound conviction is easier said than done. Moreover, Belker has a hilarious run-in with an ex-wrestler. It's also nice to see Hunter helping Belker out. In addition, there are nifty guest contributions from Charles Tyner as slimy mobster DiPiano, Jennifer Tilly as sexy, yet ditsy moll Gina, Paula Kelly as Lester's irate mother, Trinidad Silva as the sly Martinez, and Garrett Morris as a wacky derelict.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    A vein of highly unstable and volatile pure Lithium gets unearthed by a team of miners and wreaks all kinds of destructive havoc on the small town of Lost Lake. It's up to nice guy seismologist Jake Denning (a likeable performance by Kevin Sorbo) to save the day.

    Directors Jim Wynorski and Andrew Stevens keep the enjoyable story moving along at a snappy pace, generate a good deal of tension, maintain a generally serious tone with a few amusing touches of humor (one poor guy gets blown up while taking a leak!), and stage the exciting action set pieces with considerable panache. The sincere acting by the sturdy cast helps a lot: Maeghen Albach as the perky Dr. Karen Watkins, GiGi Erneta as the spunky Toni Nelson, Matthew Tompkins as greedy and unscrupulous industrialist Taylor Drake, Alex Meneses as Drake's fed-up partner Reign Palmer, Glenn Morshower as the no-nonsense General Cook, and Alex Cord as the rugged General Mark "Stonewall" Jackson. Popping up in nifty bits are James Hampton as folksy sheriff Griffith, Burton Gilliam as sleazy gas station attendant Bubba, and Stevens as newscaster Todd Moiyer. The robust score by David and Eric Wurst hits the rousing spot. Ken Blakey's slick cinematography provides an impressive polished look. The CGI effects are acceptable. An entertaining flick.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    The third political party the New Founding Fathers of America rise to power in a strife-ridden world. They decide to assert their authority by coming up with a social experiment called the purge in which all crime is legal for 12 hours. The first purge is held in an impoverished community on Staten Island where the residents are more than ready to fight back when the purge gets out of hand.

    Director Gerard McMurray keeps the bleakly absorbing story moving along at a snappy pace, maintains a chilling dark tone throughout, generates a good deal of tension, and stages the exciting action with rip-roaring flair. James DeMonaco's gutsy and biting script is loaded with plenty of stinging social commentary on such deserving targets as civil unrest caused by a floundering economy, the rich exploiting the poor (people are paid to either stay on Staten Island or participate in the purge), a nation divided by two groups on radically opposing sides of the fence, and government corruption (mercenaries are sent in by the government to ensure the first purge is a success). Moreover, McMurray and DeMonaco manage to slip in a positive message about strength in unity amid all the violence and brutality.

    The sound acting by the capable non-star cast helps a lot: Y'lan Noel as noble drug kingpin Dimitri, Lex Scott Davis as the feisty Nya, Joivan Wade as the basically decent Isaiah, Mugga as the sassy Dolores, Patch Darragh as smarmy Chief of Staff Arlo Sabian, and Rotimi Paul as unhinged junkie Skeletor. Token name Marisa Tomei does well as eager social scientist and purge creator Dr. Updale. A purge that's well worth taking.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    Several people on a small private jet plane find themselves trapped on said plane with no place to land after a major catastrophe happens on the ground. They must figure out a feasible solution to their predicament before the plane runs out of fuel.

    Writer/director Alex Travakoli keeps the enjoyably ludicrous story hurtling along at a swift pace, treats the ridiculous premise with jaw-dropping seriousness, and generates a good deal of tension. Moreover, the game cast play the silly material commendably straight: Scarlett Byrne as the spunky Lisa, Rick Cosnett as the dashing Matt, Gavin Stenhouse as Matt's moody younger brother Kyle, Morten Suurballe as dangerous stowaway Erik, Tyler Fayose as smooth dude Odin, and Carla Carolina Pimental as rowdy vixen Roxy. Sure, this film is absolute tosh, but it's done with such hysterically misguided sincerity that it's a total kitschy hoot and a half to watch from start to finish.
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