Reviews (6,278)

  • Warning: Spoilers
    Special effects make-up artist Tom Burman talks his disarming candor about his work on the low-budget horror movie "The Unseen." Burman admits that he thought that an earlier idea for the killer being kept in a cave was terrible and came up with the incest angle for the story. Burman remembers director Danny Steinmann as an abrasive man who had trouble connecting with people. Burman also reveals that he was asked by Steinmann to do the make-up for the film at a reduced fee, but turned said offer down. In addition, Burman talks about how he got started in the business making masks for Don Post before landing an apprentice gig at Fox. Worth a watch for fans of the film.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    Psychiatrist Phillip Tanner (a solid performance by Scott Broughton) decides to read the diary of teenage gal Molly Goldman (an unnerving portrayal by Kelly Francis Fischer) to figure out why she murdered her family. Phillip winds up falling into a state of insomnia and confusion that led Molly to go crazy.

    Writer/director relates the engrossing story at a steady pace, adroitly crafts a creepy and unsettling atmosphere, takes time to develop the characters, grounds the premise in a believable workaday reality, and generates a good deal of tension. The sound acting from the capable cast keeps this movie humming: Traci L. Newman as Phillip's concerned wife Charlotte, Jeffrey Wells.as pragmatic colleague Jeffrey Black, and Lauretta Compton as Phillip's sweet daughter Cindy. The surprise grim ending packs a jolting punch. A cool little flick.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    Ride share driver and struggling actor James (a fine and likeable performance by Jessie T. Usher) picks up the charismatic, but manipulative Bruno (smoothly played by Will Brill), who convinces James to go back and pick up previous passenger Jessica (a sturdy and appealing portrayal by Bella Thorne) for a wild night out on the town in Los Angeles.

    Writer/director Jeremy Ungar relates the gripping story at a brisk pace, takes time to flesh out the characters, and generates a good deal of tension as the ride becomes more increasingly nightmarish and unpredictable. The bright neon widescreen cinematography by Rob Givens boosts lots of great shots of nocturnal L. A. Moreover, the tight 76 minute running time ensures that this film never becomes too dull or overstays its welcome. A ride that's well worth taking.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    Troubled young woman Sawyer Valentini (a fine and credible performance by Claire Foy) is traumatized by her recent ordeal with a stalker. Sawyer receives treatment at a mental institution that she inadvertently commits herself to. However, Sawyer suspects that one of the staff members might be her stalker.

    Director Steven Soderbergh relates the absorbing story at a steady pace, ably crafts a pleasingly edgy, paranoid, and claustrophobic atmosphere, makes nice use of the clinic setting, and brings a sharp quirky sensibility to the interesting material which makes provocative points about the reliability and integrity of the healthcare system as well as the intrinsic fragility and unreliability of the human mind.

    The excellent acting from a tip-top cast helps a lot: Joshua Leonard as soft-spoken stalker David Strine, Jay Pharoah as the friendly and helpful Nate Hoffman, Juno Temple as brash troublemaker Violet, and Amy Irving as Sawyer's concerned mother Angela. Granted, the plot takes some preposterous turns, but that only adds to the considerable off-kilter fun of this neat little thriller.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    A trio of small-time thieves infiltrate a fancy party being held at a posh Malibu mansion disguised as caterers. Things turn nasty after the trio find out much to their horror that the guests at said party are actually recovering serial killers.

    Writer/director Chris von Hoffman relates the delightfully demented story at a zippy pace, adroitly crafts a creepy and unsettling tone, generates a good deal of tension, and further spices things up with wickedly amusing touches of inspired dark humor.

    Moreover, it's acted with zest by an enthusiastic cast: Sam Strike as the desperate Casper, Virginia Gardner as the perky Iris, Brandon Michael Hall as the easygoing Dodge, Kian Lawley as smarmy jerk Elliot Dawson, Erin Moriarty as sassy rebellious teen daughter Alexis, Robin Tunney as the sweetly composed Roxanne, Julian McMahon as the sinister Patrick, and Lance Reddick as the suave Milo. The moments of brutal and gory violence pack a savage punch. A twisted treat.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    Patrick Herschel becomes a comatose vegetable in the wake of a freak accident. Patrick's doctor dad invites several strangers to the secluded villa where he keeps Patrick alive on a bed in a secret clinic area. Naturally, said strangers start meeting untimely gruesome deaths left and right.

    Director Mario Landi relates the enjoyably lurid story at a constant pace, maintains a blithely scuzzy and depraved tone throughout, delivers oodles of deliciously gratuitous bare female flesh (scorching hot honeys Mariangela Giordano, Carmen Russo, Anna Veneziano, and Andrea Belfiore all dutifully duff their duds in the name of leering exploitation), and stages the brutal murder set pieces with go-for-the-throat gory gusto, with an especially nasty and drawn out violation/impalement via fire poker rating as the definite splatter highlight. Moreover, we also get a funky-throbbing Goblinesque score, some choice gut-busting cruddy dialogue (favorite line: "Screaming women make me nervous"), and lots of conspicuous consumption of J&B whiskey (of course!). A total trashy treat.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    April, 2015. A group of retirement age career criminals pull off an audacious multi-million dollar heist at the Hatton Garden safe deposit company in London, England.

    Director/co-writer Terry Lee Coker relates the absorbing story at a snappy pace, takes time to develop the characters, maintains an engaging matter-of-fact tone throughout, and further spices things up with an amusing sense of cheeky humor. The big gig is quite tense, precise, and exciting.

    The fine acting from the sturdy cast keeps this movie humming: Michael McKell as the brash Basil, Sidney Livingstone as the tubby, but resolute Brian Reader, Robert Putt as the scrappy Terry Perkins, James Osborne as the tough Daniel Jones, and Sidney Kean as the antsy John Collins. Moreover, the old guys' need to go out with some kind of bang gives this picture some extra depth and pathos. A worthwhile movie.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    Larger than life adventurer Baron Munchausen (well played with considerable suave panache by Milos Kopecky) relates colorful tales of his outrageous exploits that include meeting a man on the moon, defeating a Turkish army all by himself, and being swallowed whole by a whale.

    Writer/director Karel Zeman brings a perfectly charming sense of awe, wonder, splendor, and enchantment to the imaginative material that's both utterly delightful and positively magical in equal measure. Shot in gorgeous sepia tones, with a glorious wealth of striking visuals and endearingly obvious old school practical f/x, this film often plays like an animated painting brought to vivid and spirited life. A total treat.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    Government hitman Jack (a fine and credible performance by Jack Jagodka) accidentally kills the son of his latest target. Jack has twelve hours to take out his nefarious boss Eastwood (smoothly played by Kevin Mangar) or else it's curtains for him.

    Writer/director David Newton keeps the gripping story zipping along at a snappy pace, takes time to develop the characters, maintains a tough gritty tone throughout, and stages the plentiful exciting action with considerable muscular aplomb. The sturdy acting from the able cast helps a lot: Connie Jenkins-Greig as Jack's catatonic daughter Amber, Vanessa Coffey as the hard-nosed Hawkins, Elena Larios as sweet au pair Camila, Beau Fowler as the shifty Fowler, and Katrina Durden as the lethal Katarina. The surprise ending is a doozy. A bang-up little flick.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    Practicing teenage witch Faye (a fine and sympathetic portrayal by Georgina Jane) summons up the evil demon Cupid (Bao Tieu sporting funky make-up) to exact a harsh revenge on the mean girls at school who played a cruel prank on her.

    Writer/director Scott Jeffrey relates the enjoyable and engrossing story at a constant pace, takes time to develop the characters, ably crafts a creepy atmosphere, generates a good deal of tension, stages the brutal kills with savage gusto, and delivers several cool bits of nasty gore. Moreover, Cupid makes for a really gnarly beast while Cupid's dark origins prove to be quite interesting. The solid acting from a capable cast keeps this movie humming: Michael Owusu as charming and hunky teacher Duncan Jones, Abi Casson Thompson as the sweet Helen Drake, Ali Barouti as the smitten Matt, Sarah T. Cohen as the snarky Elise, and Adrian Bauchet as the irate Principal Harper. A neat little fright flick.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    Two British con artists relocate to Los Angeles and hatch a plan to steal an expensive diamond ring in order to pay off a huge gambling debt.

    Sound good? Well, alas it just ain't due to two grossly unappealing main characters: Uma Thurman as the gorgeous, but cold and calculating Harry Fox and Tim Roth as her coarse drunken husband Peter make for an immensely hateful and off-putting pair. Moreover, Alice Eve as spoiled rotten rich gal Jackie, Crispin Glover as womanizing heel Gabriel, Sofia Vergara as vampy starlet Vivien, and Parker Posey as the snarky Gina are likewise extremely obnoxious and revolting individuals who are supposed to be funny, but instead come across as merely insufferable. Only Maggie Q as the slinky, but deadly Irina Solokov and Stephen Fry as smarmy connection Sidney manage to be fairly amusing. Despite polished production values and a stellar cast, this one overall proves to be a big letdown.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    Adam Thatcher (a solid and convincing performance by Adam Hampton) receives a mysterious box from a relative that contains a nasty little beast inside of it that will kill everyone Adam loves unless he passes said box onto someone he loves within a certain amount of time.

    Writer/director Ryan Bellgardt relates the enjoyable and absorbing story at a quick pace, takes time to develop the characters, maintains a surprisingly grim no-holds-barred tone throughout, and stages the monster attack scenes with flair and skill. Moreover, the CGI creature looks pretty gnarly. The sound acting from the able cast keeps this movie humming: Kristy K. Boone as spunky wife Julie, Catcher Stair as sweet son Charlie, Katie Burgess as rebellious teen daughter Anna, Michael Anthony Page as amiable Detective Morris Patterson, Mike Waugh as the paranoid Jim Roberts, Connie Franklin as Adam's foxy paramour Natalie Rose, and Caleb Milby as Anna's feckless boyfriend Tyler Cook. A neat little fright flick.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    Ryan Stevens (a solid and credible performance by Micah Lyons, who also wrote the compact script and co-directed) has his hands full trying to raise his rebellious teenage sister Zoe (an appealing portrayal by Netty Lynch) after both their parents die in a car accident. When Zoe gets abducted by ruthless procurer Marty (a deliciously slimy turn by Joey Loomis, another co-director) who plans on selling her to sex traffickers, it's up to Ryan to save her before it's too late.

    Directors Lyons and Loomis keep the gripping story moving along at a constant pace, generate a good deal of tension, maintain a tough gritty tone throughout, and stage the exciting action with considerable aplomb. Moreover, the love between brother and sister gives this picture some real heart. This film further benefits from sturdy acting from a capable cast: Jason Peter Kennedy as scruffy, but loyal friend Kooter, Tom Sizemore as amiable and helpful priest Pastor Dave Twiss, Brooke Lyons as the scared Alana, "Big" Jack Little as hulking brute Damien, and Rhonda Morman as the vicious Cash Money. An on the money movie.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    The 1920's. A mysterious sinister figure dressed in a black robe and brandishing a scythe arrives in a small Southern town to exact harsh punishments on various sinners.

    Director Charles Reynolds relates the absorbing oddball story at a deliberate pace, presents a flavorsome evocation of the period setting, and delivers several strong moments of spot-on creepy gloom-doom atmosphere. Tom McIntyre's thoughtful script not only offers a colorful array of deliciously detestable characters, but also provides a strong and provocative central message about sin, redemption, and second chances.

    Moreover, it's acted with zest by a game no-name cast, with especially stand-out contributions from William T. Hicks as greedy banker Sharpe, Helene Tryon as nasty old bat Mrs. Fitch, and Brownlee Davis as the angry Charlie. The deadly serious Christian aesthetic gives this movie its own unique identity. Worth a watch for horror fans looking for something way out of the ordinary.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    Make-up artist Craig Reardon talks in thorough detail about his work on the low-budget horror film "The Unseen." Reardon reveals how he landed the gig through a telephone call from Rick Baker, who had to turn the project down because he was too busy at the time. Reardon remembers Danny Steinmann as an enthusiastic guy, recalls Sydney Lassick as a sweet and eccentric person, and gives Stephen Furst props for his patience in the make-up chair. Reardon also goes into detail about the corpse he made of Ernest's father and how he had to modify the initial make-up design he devised for Junior because of a clash he had with fellow make-up artist Tom Burman. In addition, Reardon shares a cute story about Barbara Bach and the movie "Caveman." Worth a watch for fans of the film.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    Evil rich guy Artigas concocts a wicked plot to use a super explosive device to conquer the world from his headquarters inside a volcano.

    Director/co-writer Karel Zeiman relates the hugely enjoyable story at a fitful pace and maintains a winningly sincere tone throughout while also presenting a wondrous wealth of eye-popping imaginative imagery that includes assorted exotic sea life, air ships, submarines, and even an underwater city. Moreover, the dazzling stylized look gives this picture the aura of a vividly realized dream come true while the practical f/x possess a lovely hands-on homemade charm. A true delight.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    Introverted young guy Bridd Cole (a fine and likeable performance by Austin Herbert) lives a quiet mundane life by choice. However, after receiving a mysterious package left behind by his long deceased mother, Bridd discovers that he's anything but ordinary.

    Writer/director Iqbal Ahmed relates the compelling story at a constant pace, takes time to develop the characters, grounds the fantastic premise in a believable workaday reality, and provides a sweet central romance between Bridd and perky fugitive Charlotte Parker (a lively and appealing portrayal by Alexis Carra) that in turn gives this movie a lot of charm and heart. Moreover, this film further benefits from having the plot being told from a really intimate and engaging human level. A neat little flick.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    Formerly prestigious film editor Rey Ciso (a fine performance by Adam Brooks) makes do cutting together trashy exploitation flicks after losing four fingers on his right hand. When folks involved in the latest picture Rey's working on start meeting gruesome untimely ends, naturally Rey gets pegged as the prime suspect behind the murders.

    Writer/director Brooks and Michael Kennedy astutely capture the more gloriously lurid and outrageous aspects of 70's Italian giallo horror fare while also gleefully poking madcap fun at same: We've got a ridiculously convoluted plot full of absurd twists and turns, deliciously excessive blood-spurting violence, pulsating music, colorful characters, scorching hot kinky sex, stylish widescreen cinematography, overripe dialogue, a pleasing plenitude of tasty bare female skin, and even a totally bonkers surprise ending.

    Moreover, it's acted with zest by an enthusiastic cast: Paz de la Huerta as faded starlet Josephine Jardin, Matthew Kennedy as pesky macho inspector Peter Porfiry, Conor Sweeney as vapid blonde hunk Cal Konitz, Udo Kier as flaky shrink Dr. Casini, Laurence Harvey as the helpful Father Clarke, Kevin Anderson as crude producer Francesco Mancini, Samantha Hill as eager apprentice Bella, Tristan Risk as the lusty Veronica, and Brett Donahue as stuck-up jerk Claudio Berti. A delightfully over-the-top treat.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    The ups and downs on the life of singer/songwriter John Denver (a sincere and likeable performance by Chad Lowe) that includes Denver defying his hard-nosed Air Force pilot father (a convincing turn by Gerald McRaney), struggling through the 1960's to secure a record contract before hitting it big in the early 1970's, his humanitarian endeavors, and, most of all, Denver's warm, but strained relationship with his first wife Annie (a luminous and appealing portrayal by Kristin Davis).

    Director Jerry London relates the engrossing story at a steady pace as well as maintains an engaging heartfelt tone throughout. Stephan Harrigan's thoughtful script sometimes attempts to cram in too much about Denver's life in a condensed amount of time, but overall does a commendable job of capturing Denver's folksy charm and genuine love for both flying and the environment. Brian Martinson lends sturdy support as Denver's loyal manager Hal Thau. The choice soundtrack of lovely John Denver songs helps a lot. A sweet and touching film.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    New York homicide investigators undercover a slew of videocassettes at an old abandoned house in Poughkeepsie, New York. Said tapes depict the heinous exploits of cunning, evasive, and sadistic serial killer Edward Carver (a frighteningly convincing portrayal by Ben Messmer).

    Writer/director John Eric Dowdle ingeniously utilizes a deliberately rough around the edges pseudo documentary style complete with interviews with various relatives and law enforcers, a few dramatic reenactments, and degraded VHS footage of the psycho's horrible acts that works like gangbusters when it comes to creating and sustaining a deeply creepy and disturbing mood.

    Moreover, the unflinchingly dark, grim, and nihilistic tone along with the fact that the killer is till at large at the end gives this picture an extra chilling edge. Stacy Chbosky contributes a stand-out turn as abducted teen and lone survivor Cheryl Dempsey. A very potent and upsetting film.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    A group of dwarf miners must work together in order to survive after the find themselves trapped inside a mountain in the wake of a cave in.

    Director/co-writer Chris Raney relates the gripping story at a deliberate pace, generates a good deal of claustrophobic atmosphere, maintains a sober despairing tone throughout, and makes excellent use of the cramped cave setting. The fine acting from the able no-name cast helps a lot: Brent Bateman as the hearty Odryd, John Hutton as the crusty Calcus, and Robert Morgan as the gruff Brenn. Worth a watch.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    A psycho with a large mallet violently disrupts a scout's meeting in the woods. Writer/director Peter Hearn joyfully goes overboard with the outrageous bloody violence as various people kill each other left and right. Moreover, the lack of any dialogue in favor of a more direct emphasis on music and sound effects gives this short an extra odd and unnerving edge. It's also acted with zest by an enthusiastic cast, with an especially stand-out turn by Derek Jones as a grouchy old caretaker. Well worth a watch.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    Four young boys are magically transported back in time to a magical prehistoric world. Director Karel Zeman does a nice job of astutely capturing a lovely sense of child-like awe and wonder as our likeable protagonists encounter all kinds of cool creatures from the long distant past. Moreover, the neat matte paintings, nifty puppets, and funky stop-motion animation all possess a certain quaint old school practical charm. Better still, this film proves to be quite educational as it provides a wealth of illuminating information on the assorted exotic ancient creatures. A sweet and charming little treat.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    Evil alien invaders attack the city of Los Angeles. A small band of Air National Guardsmen stationed in the hills fight back against said alien invaders.

    Writer/director Mark Atkins keeps the derivative, but still eventful and enjoyable story zipping along at a breathless brisk pace, maintains a generally serious tone throughout, blows lots of stuff up real good, and stages the plentiful exciting action with rip-roaring go-for-it gusto.

    This movie further benefits from a pleasing mean'n'lean Grade B aesthetic that gets down to thrilling brass tacks with a refreshing minimum of pretense. Moreover, it's acted with zest by an enthusiastic cast: Nia Peeples as the two-fisted Captain Karla Smith, Kel Mitchell as the eager Lt. Tyler Laughlin, Dylan Vox as WW II bomber pilot Captain Pete Rodgers, Theresa June-Tao as the feisty Lt. Solano, Edward DeRuiter as the cowardly Captain Arnstead, and Rober Pike Daniel as the gruff Commander Wakes. The CGI effects are pretty decent considering the modest budget. A total schlocky blast.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    A well-respected and well-educated urban family inherit an old country house located deep in the Portugal countryside. No big surprise that said house has a dark history behind it.

    While the basic premise has potential, alas directors Tiago Guedes and Frederico Serra let the meandering story unfold at a painfully sluggish pace. Moreover, the plot gets bogged down in way too much deadly dull domestic drama, with precious little in the way of any essential tension or creepy atmosphere. The teeming surplus of debates concerning faith, religion, and superstition offer some interesting food for thought, but for the most part only add to the overall sense of numbing ennui. It would have also helped if more stuff was clarified instead of being hinted at. Fortunately, the fine acting from the committed cast and often gorgeous cinematography keep this movie watchable, but this film could and should have been much better.
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