The Women (1939)

Not Rated   |    |  Comedy, Drama


The Women (1939) Poster

A study of the lives and romantic entanglements of various interconnected women.


7.8/10
11,804

Videos


Photos

  • George Cukor and Norma Shearer in The Women (1939)
  • Joan Crawford and Rosalind Russell in The Women (1939)
  • Norma Shearer and Virginia Weidler in The Women (1939)
  • The Women (1939)
  • Norma Shearer and Virginia Weidler in The Women (1939)
  • Joan Crawford at an event for The Women (1939)

See all photos

Get More From IMDb

For an enhanced browsing experience, get the IMDb app on your smartphone or tablet.

Get the IMDb app

Awards

1 win.

Reviews & Commentary

Add a Review


User Reviews


7 September 2000 | Caledonia Twin #1
9
| Divinely Funny
I just saw this film for the first time a few months ago. I laughed harder than I remember laughing at anything made in the last twenty years. The Women is brilliantly written, brilliantly acted, and a whole lot of fun! Norma Shearer is such a sympathetic Mrs. Haines, and the "Jungle red" scene had me in laughing fits. I just could not stop the video for anything. Rosalind Russell was so funny! I thought the scene in the exercise room was absolutely hysterical. I've always been a fan of the demeure Joan Fontaine of Rebecca, and I was surprised to see her here, though not surprised that she played the lamb! This film is such a delight. I think anyone of any age would enjoy it.

Critic Reviews



More Like This

Dinner at Eight

Dinner at Eight

A Woman's Face

A Woman's Face

Stage Door

Stage Door

Camille

Camille

Auntie Mame

Auntie Mame

Mildred Pierce

Mildred Pierce

Ninotchka

Ninotchka

Holiday

Holiday

Libeled Lady

Libeled Lady

The Women

The Women

The Awful Truth

The Awful Truth

Now, Voyager

Now, Voyager

Did You Know?

Trivia

Ernest Lubitsch was the first choice for director.


Quotes

Crystal Allen: It will be out tomorrow, Mrs. Prowler.
Sylvia Fowler: FOWLER!
Crystal Allen: Oh I'm so sorry...
Crystal Allen: Mrs. Fowler.


Goofs

When Mary is on the phone with Stephen during the lunch party, she puts a cigarette in her mouth and strikes a match, lighting it, the cigarette doesn't light, and she holds the unlit thing through the rest of the conversation. When they cut to long shot of her hanging up the phone, the cigarette is smoking, and she stabs it out in an ashtray.


Crazy Credits

In the opening credits, before the photo images of the actresses are shown, their characters are revealed by images of various animals.


Alternate Versions

At the start of the Technicolor Adrian fashion show, the video and TV versions have traditionally shown a Technicolor stage in the middle of the screen surrounded by pure white (this always struck me as odd but I never thought too much about it). The original 1939 version of the scene shows the Technicolor stage surrounded by the rest of the room IN BLACK AND WHITE, using a stenciling process developed for (but ultimately unused in) The Wizard of Oz (1939). Presumably, because the reel starts right BEFORE the transition, it was either too much trouble and expense to process the small bit of stray black and white footage for television (it would have to have been printed separately onto each release print in 1939)or, more likely, the footage has been lost. The new video and cable versions show The Women (1939) in a reconstruction of the original version, with the Technicolor stage printed over a black and white still from later in the film. The image, as now presented, is much less jarring than the original video release. The fashion show was also shot in black and white, with the models interacting with the stars as they move throughout the boutique. After principal photography ended, MGM decided to re-shoot the fashion show in Technicolor (this color footage was not shot by George Cukor)and the models no longer interact with Norma Shearer, 'Rosalind Russell', etc. The original black and white footage, saved in the MGM vault, can now be seen as a special feature on the Warner DVD. Older television prints often showed the fashion show in black and white, but it was not this alternate footage, just the color sequence printed without its tints.


Soundtracks

Forevermore
(1939) (uncredited)
Music by
Edward Ward
Lyrics by Chet Forrest and Bob Wright
Played at the end and sung by an offscreen chorus

Storyline

Plot Summary


Synopsis (WARNING: Spoilers)


Genres

Comedy | Drama

What to Watch: "Mrs. Maisel," "Vikings," and More

Save yourself from endless browsing with our list of top TV picks for the week, including a 16-time Emmy winner, the final season of "Vikings," and Scarlett Johansson's latest film.

Watch our video

Featured on IMDb

Check out the action from New York Comic Con check out what IMDb editors are watching this month, and more.

Around The Web

 | 

Powered by ZergNet

More To Explore

Search on Amazon.com