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Sayonara (1957)

Not Rated   |    |  Drama, Romance


Sayonara (1957) Poster

A US Air Force major in Kobe confronts his own opposition to marriages between American servicemen and Japanese women when he falls for a beautiful performer.

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7.2/10
5,268

Photos

  • Marlon Brando with Miiko Taka in "Sayonara" 1957 Warner Bros.
  • Marlon Brando in Sayonara (1957)
  • Marlon Brando and Miiko Taka in Sayonara (1957)
  • Marlon Brando and Miiko Taka in Sayonara (1957)
  • Marlon Brando and Miiko Taka in "Sayonara" 1957 Warner Bros.
  • "Sayonara" Red Buttons 1957 Warner

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User Reviews


31 July 2001 | rad111
Not bad for 1957
There's no doubt that this is a dated film. But there are certain advantages to that. It's definitely a film of its time, and as such is very revealing. Although some of the dialogue and characterizations (not to mention the music) inspire giggles, there's a fair amount to be admired here. I was pleasantly surprised by how frank the film is in its portrayal of institutionalized racism and its effects on the rank-and-file soldiers and the buracracy that controls their lives. Red Buttons and the woman who played his wife both won Oscars for their roles, and deservedly so. They are not the main characters of the film, but they embody the film's message and its spirit as well, and are the most naturally written characters in the movie.

Red Buttons's display of rage when his wife attempts to disguise her ethnicity is amazingly genuine and moving.

Yes, the women are portrayed in a derogatory fashion, as a previous reviewer has observed. But this was 1957, after all, and on top of that the film takes place in a military setting. Add to that the fact that Japan at that time was at least as bad as the West in its treatment of women and it's hardly a surprise that the gender dynamic is what it is. The most ironic thing, I found, was the fact that although Hollywood was comfortable casting Asian women in the film, the one speaking role by a Japanese male character (who has a subtly romantic role in relation to an American woman) was given to Ricardo Monalban. It was okay to have miscegenation portrayed with some frankness, as long as it involved Japanese women, not Japanese men. Sad,

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